How to be a bada$$ at work and stay true to your values!

Whether you work in a corporate job or are an entrepreneur, there’s always a balancing act of how much of the real you to show.  You want to be true to who you are, yet societal rules, unspoken politics and corporate hierarchy (in some cases) dictate that only a part of you shows up, while the other parts remain hidden.

But what if something happens at your company where your values are compromised?

Recently this came up for me in my own personal experience and as much as I’d love to say it was easy to deal with and justice prevailed, sadly it didn’t, and it got me thinking. 

How often does this happen in the workplace and how do people deal with it? 

Throughout my career, time and experience have told me this is more common than you might think, and most people don’t know how to deal with it.  I’ve had countless conversations with professionals who have shared a story or an experience they’ve had where something happened that was a direct clash with their values.  In fact, in many cases, they were having a conversation with me because they chose to leave their jobs due to a misalignment with the company and their core values.

So, I got curious and thought about a few things to keep in mind if you’re faced with a situation at work that infringes on your values:

1. What’s the lesson you can learn from that experience?

When something happens where you feel your values were compromised, what’s the lesson you can walk away with?  Are you able to take a step back and consider, what is this experience trying to teach you?  Lessons sometimes come much later after an experience has occurred, but sometimes, it doesn’t take long to realize what an experience is trying to show you if you’re aware!

2. Is there an opportunity to educate your company to help them evolve?

Yes, it’s possible your efforts could fall on deaf ears and your company may not be ready to ‘hear’ or be open to receiving your message to help them evolve.  At the very least, it’s an opportunity to educate where they may be missing the mark.

3. How can you use the experience to help yourself and someone else? 

The disconnect you experienced with your company could be the very gift that you can give to not only your company or someone you know to help them evolve, but yourself.  It’s very easy to internalize and personalize an experience where you feel like you’re the only one in your organization that stands strong to holding your values close to heart.  Instead, consider this a GIFT that you’re honoring your values and recognize that they’re important enough to you to stand for.  See this for what it is and use it to help yourself assess any next steps or course of action.

It’s never easy when you’re put in a situation where your values are being compromised, especially in the workplace.  While it might be difficult to just up and leave your organization if it’s not an immediate option for you, you do always have a choice. 

Use your voice for good and speak your truth even if your voice shakes.

Have you ever faced an experience in your workplace or with a client where your values were compromised? 

I’d love to hear your thoughts.  I know it’s a bit of sticky topic but one I hope you see how helpful it could be to share with others how you might have dealt with this in your own experience.  If you have anything else to add to this topic, I’d love to hear it just the same!

Lot’s of love

Lisa 

Not sure what direction to take following your mat leave? Here’s what you should be thinking about

Taking a break from a thriving career to focus on starting and building a family can be such an exciting time.  For my go-getter, hustler, career-driven women, I know this can also be an adjustment when taking that step back.

Now that your mat leave is up and you’re ready to return to the workforce, you might realize the adjustment is more difficult than you anticipated.

So where do you start?

If you happen to work in a corporate environment and returning to the same job, your adjustment might look different than someone who is taking a leap a faith and deciding to start something completely different and new.  Particularly if you took more than the traditional 1 year of maternity leave (standard in Canada), but perhaps, a couple of years off.

The return can be confusing, difficult to understand where to start, and you may have a slew of other questions you might be challenging yourself with.

How do I re-brand myself when I’ve been out of the workforce for so long?

What level should I be targeting?  (you might consider this depending on where you were in your career before you left, etc.)

My resume has a gap in it, how do I best reflect my time off and stand out?

Naturally, the answers and your direction will vary for each of you depending on your needs. 

Some of you might want to return p/t, while some might want/need flexible hours, some need something close to home and are not open to a commute, etc.  Starting your own business may become an even more attractive option, as a result, to cover off on all these factors, thereby eliminating a traditional job search altogether. 

The idea is, you need to get *crystal clear* on what your “must haves” are and what you’re looking for.  From there, it will be much easier to target the appropriate opportunities for you and embark on a search.

Often, I’ve had candidates share they had a resume writer put their resume together as they were preparing to embark on a job search.  If you do take this route, make sure you know what you’re looking for and what your target is beforehand.  No sense in updating a resume to simply look ‘eye-catching’ on paper if you have no idea what you want, right?  Work from the inside out. 

  • Self-reflect – What’s important to you now that you’ve had a child?
  • Consider what you loved about your career – industry, role, etc.
  • What direction do you want to go in now – take a step back?  Go in a new direction altogether?
  • Think about your strengths and skills 

When it comes to your resume, include the things you’ve been doing while you’ve been off work such as:

  • Volunteer work – any charity work, whether you simply participated or organized directly
  • Contributing to your son/daughters’ school – PTA committee or other
  • Freelance/consulting/project related assignments you did even for a short period of time
  • Courses/workshops/conferences that you might have participated in or attended to keep up to date with what’s been going on in your industry
  • If you contributed to a blog or even started one while you were off to share your insights, etc.

The idea here is you want to be able to highlight anything you’ve been doing in addition to raising a family.  Without meeting and interviewing you in person to explain your gap while on maternity leave, your background and experience is what people see on paper, so you want to highlight everything and anything that is relevant.

The little things are important so don’t leave them out!

The transition back to the workforce can be an adjustment regardless of which direction you take.  Taking the time to self-reflect, figure out what your vision for yourself looks like returning to the workforce, can help alleviate the stress associated with the lead up when it’s time to go back to work. 

I’d love to hear from you as always!  Remember, your comments can help inspire someone who may need to hear YOUR perspective, so don’t be shy!

If you’ve ever made the transition back to the workforce after a maternity leave, if you found you struggled to make the return, what could have helped with the transition to make it easier for you?

Thanks for stopping by, and if you’re in this very place in your life, I wish you the greatest success on your return!

Lisa ❤

You’ve had one, I’ve had one – here’s how to talk about it in an interview

Most of us can relate to going through a bad experience throughout our careers, some of us, unfortunately, more than once.  Anything from a terrible boss, to being fired, to dealing with a difficult peer/colleague, to a toxic work environment, the list goes on and can all be attributed to bad experiences on the job.

The truth is, when it comes to our careers, there are times we fall short, even when we do our due diligence to make the right choices with the information we have.  For instance, we miss a sign, ignore that feeling we might have about an opportunity whether it’s the people, structure, culture, etc.  Before you know it, we find ourselves choosing a company that ultimately is in misalignment with what you’re looking for and what’s right for us.

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When turning down a MAJOR business opportunity is the RIGHT decision

These days, so many of us have a ‘side hustle’ in addition to a full-time gig OR you may just be a straight up entrepreneur and that’s all you’ve ever known. The corporate gigs haven’t been your thing and you only know how to work for yourself, following your dreams whether through a product or service-based business.

Maybe you’re on the other side of that and have been in a full-time job and have made the decision to leave and pursue a business of your own. (yay! Koodo’s to you)

While the better part of my career has had me focus on people and cultivating relationships with all sorts of talent, I’ve learned on my personal journey how important marketing is to any business.  Regardless of your path as an entrepreneur or small business owner.

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Playing it safe? How lack of creativity & fear are holding you back! ?

Do you ever feel like there’s only ONE way to do something?  Does confidence and fear get in the way of your ability to be creative and move forward?

This past weekend, I happened to get caught up with a friend and our catch up led to a rich conversation on playing it safe, fear, confidence and timing to name just a few of the things we touched on.

We started off catching up on our respective Euro trips that we both took separately at the end of the summer, exchanging stories and laughs and sharing our most memorable moments.  We then switched gears to talking about our realities and she shared she was on a quest to figuring out what to do next in her job.

She’s spent a considerable amount of her career with one company where she’s progressed but had reached a plateau and was feeling like she was consistently getting overlooked for promotions.  She was ready to get to the next level and was feeling like not only was she being looked over, but she wasn’t provided a clear path on what she needed to do to get there and time was ticking.  At this point, her confidence has begun to be affected, self-worth, and her own capabilities were just some of the things she started to doubt within herself.

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Leading your company through adversity? 3 things to keep in mind as leader

The workforce has changed tremendously over the last 10 + years.  Virtual set up’s, flexible working environments, social media has exploded and has influenced and impacted business’s and the way we do business.  Not to mention the landscape for talent has changed across the board with an increase in competition and more choices than we had before.

So, with how quickly and how vast the workforce has changed and evolved, shouldn’t leaders also evolve in their approach when it comes to challenging times in your business?

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Have you ever been in the transition stage?

Ok, this one is a little longer than some of my other posts so I hope you’ll stick around long enough to read to the end as it’s got some helpful insights that I hope you’ll find helpful.  If it doesn’t apply to you today, maybe someone in your life can benefit, so please share it with them.

You’ve been laid off.  You’ve spent 10 + years with your employer, given them your all, dedicated your time and energy to achieving a common goal and find yourself shocked and an emotional mess.

Continue reading “Have you ever been in the transition stage?”

If you don’t know, now you know

Most of my posts so far have been around topics outside of actual recruiting.
I’m passionate about a lot of areas within business in general, however when it comes to PEOPLE in the workplace and talent, recruiting, hiring and everything else in between I get REALLY tuned in.

I’m so amazed at how there are such various types of interview processes across organizations all to find the best of the best’ when hiring for an open position.  Gone are the days where you would put an ad in the paper, someone would apply, you would call them in for an interview, you would interview them once maybe twice with someone else on your team, and they were hired.

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How important is culture fit for your organization?

Culture Fit – these buzz words float across all organizations and you often hear, “our company culture is so important to us”, to “we have to hire for culture fit above everything else”, to “I’m not even sure what our culture is.”

But what does culture fit really mean, and as a company should you really hire for culture fit?

An organization’s culture is made up of the core values, beliefs and behavior by a group of people.  It often makes a statement on WHO the people are behind the company regardless if you are a product and/or service-based business.

So why do companies put such an emphasis on culture and what does this mean for your ability to attract talent? Also, what does this mean for your existing employees?

The truth is the culture of a company sets the tone of what I call the HEART of the company. Your people are the ones behind it – from your leadership team to the very people doing the day to day operations and execution of whatever your business is (product or service based). They are the ones that collectively, shape it.  They embody and reflect the values and beliefs of your company (or they should).  With that said, whatever ‘culture’ you create – make sure it’s one people want to be a part of.

Being in recruiting, I often get asked the question by candidates on the regular around, “can you tell me more about what the culture is like”? Ultimately, people want to align themselves with a company that shares similar values and work ethic as their own.

But what happens when people don’t want to work for your company BECAUSE of your culture? You have the best brand/product/service, etc. and yet still can’t seem to attract the right talent.  As an employer, do you just assume they’re not the right culture fit, or do you assess and evaluate if there’s something about your culture that needs to be re-evaluated?

There are a few things I like to consider when I think about culture.  Maybe this might help you think about your own company culture.   Especially if you’re in the middle of shifting what that looks like and embarking on a cultural change, which can often be taxing and a challenge in and of itself.   Change is important, it’s inevitable and can be well worth it with the right intentions.

PEOPLE – probably one of the most important aspects to consider.  WHO are the people that will thrive the best in your organization?  What makes up the characters, backgrounds, work ethics, etc.  Do they align with your company values?

Service – do what you do with the intention that it can serve and help someone other than yourself. Do you have a strong philanthropic arm to your business? Do you support volunteer work? Do you give back to your local community?  This should be part of every business out there. A mindset, a belief and a way of doing business with the intention of giving back in some way. Yes, you need to run a business and make money, but it shouldn’t overrule your people or be more important than being of service to others.

Vision – Define your company’s mission and have a clear, strategic direction and vision.  Where is the company going?  What do you want the future to look like?

Values – what are these? Are they clearly defined? Remember, whatever values you list as important to your company, you have a responsibility to reflect them and embody them every day. This starts with your executive leadership team.

Place/Location – where does the HEART of your organization live? Is it in the hustle and bustle of the city? Are you accessible? Or are you set up virtually? Something to think about.

These are just a few aspects of what I think makes up a company culture and sets the tone of a strong one to say the least.

When you’re thinking about evaluating your own as an employer, make sure it’s clearly defined and it’s one where people stay because of it.

I’d love to hear from you!

What kind of culture’s have you been a part of in your career?  What about that company culture resonated with you the most?

If you could change one thing about your current company culture, what would that be and why?

Thanks as always for your time!

With so much appreciation,

Lisa ♥

Have you figured this out yet?

At what point do we learn or KNOW who we are, and get it ‘right’ by aligning ourselves with the right job?   What about aligning ourselves with the right company, working with the right people and doing meaningful work?

For me, this was something that I was hunting and searching for the longest time.  I got out of school with my degree in HR and was determined to get a job that aligned to my degree.  From there, I figured I would just continue to grow in my job, learn new skills, figure out with experience what I liked, what I didn’t like, etc.   All the while, not even questioning that maybe I was just going through the motions and doing things that I didn’t necessarily think I should be doing, but more that I knew how to do, I learned to do and I would grow to enjoy.

Continue reading “Have you figured this out yet?”