Is fear keeping you stuck? Here are 4 questions to ask yourself

Fear in the spiritual sense is the absence of love.  In everyday life, it looks like this…

“I need to make enough money in case something happens.”

                                      Or

“I have to go to that conference, or I won’t meet any new clients.”

                                      Or

“If I ask for time off, they’ll think I’m lazy and not working hard enough.”

                                      Or

“If I don’t go to that party, they’ll judge me and won’t invite me next time.”

These are just some of the everyday thoughts and stories we tell ourselves that ultimately create a belief that tells us we HAVE to do something which in most cases goes against what we actually want to do.  We create a narrative, worrying about something that hasn’t even happened and thinking about what others will think of you before you even take action.

I’ve had my own share of fear and still do to this day, but I’ve learned to recognize it, understand where it stems from and still choose to act on the smallest of decisions to some of the most important ones in my life.

I’ve spoken about fear before because I believe so strongly that so many of us can benefit from understanding that everything we actually want is on the other side of that fear.  The biggest opportunity you have is understanding where it comes from so when/if it comes up again, you can move past it with greater ease.

A fear-based mentality inevitably finds its way in all areas of our lives and unfortunately can stop us in our tracks from taking inspired action or any action at all to something we want to do!

If you can find that place where when you know you’re being crippled by a fear-based thought, take a step back and ask yourself:

  • How do I feel about this thought?
  • What is this feeling trying to tell me?
  • Where is this thought coming from?
  • What are the thoughts and feelings that will serve me moving forward?

Remember, your fears don’t always come in the major moments or milestones in your life, they can also creep in the smallest most insignificant of experiences!  The key is to be aware of them so you can face them and move past them.

Let me know what you think, what are your thoughts? Leave a comment below.

Where has fear impacted your daily life?

Have you been able to recognize a fear you had and still move forward?

Thanks for stopping by and remember, you’re stronger than your fears, more courageous than you think and braver than you know!

Lisa xo

Spring is around the corner! What’s your new beginning?

Have you ever thought about how the ending of something in your life or business could very well be the beginning of something new?  Most of us tend to focus on what we’re losing, giving up, sacrificing, ‘ending’, vs. what it could mean for the start or beginning of something new.  Even if we don’t know what that is yet!

For me, this time of year always marks the start of new beginnings and the obvious ending of the Winter season.  Many of us in North America LOVE this time of year as it marks the start of longer days, warmer temperatures, sunshine and patio season is in sight. 

How can we apply this same meaning of changes of the seasons to our own lives?  Embracing a new start and welcoming the new, while saying goodbye to the old and why is it so hard for us to be open to what’s to come?

The idea of something ending can often be interpreted as the ‘loss’ of something.  We take it to mean something much deeper and attach a sentimental, or a symbolic meaning to the experience.  Whether we’re expecting a specific outcome or result, associating a particular achievement to an experience, associating status or even feeling like we have to prove something to someone else.

Here are a couple of examples of what this could look like in our lives.

You’re anticipating a promotion and lose the opportunity to someone else.

  • You say, “I’m not good enough”

You interview for a position and you don’t get it.

  • You say, “I’m not smart enough”

You apply for a business loan and you don’t get it.

  • You say, “They don’t think I have what it takes”

You launch your first program/workshop/masterclass in your business and no one signs up.

  • You say, “What I have to offer isn’t valuable enough”

Nearly every one of these examples, can be chalked up to your self-worth. Not feeling good enough or not feeling worthy enough as you are, regardless of how you finish any of these sentences.  We almost instinctively internalize it to mean something about our own self-worth. 

So, what if instead you re-framed your answers and said this:

You’re anticipating a promotion and lose the opportunity to someone else.

  • You say, “There’s something bigger in store for me”

You interview for a position that you don’t get.

  • You say, “There’s a better position out there for me”

You apply for a business loan and you don’t get it.

  • You say, “Now may not be the right time, I’ll try again”

You launch your first program/workshop/masterclass in your business and no one signs up.

  • You say, “I’ll review my offering, and launch it again”

There is ALWAYS a better way to view the ‘loss’ or ‘ending’ or perceived ‘missed opportunity’, to a greater blessing up ahead or something ultimately better for you.  You may not know what that might look like, or what it might be and you may not always get what you want when you want it, but you do get what you need in the perfect time. 

Your job is simply to be open to what could be without being attached to what was lost or what’s ending.  The first shot at something also doesn’t have to be the last, so yes, try, try and try again.

What can you look at in your own life right now that you feel you didn’t get? That promotion, that new job, that big win or sale and instead, what could be the ‘new beginning’ that is waiting for you?

Let me know in the comment box below!

Spring is around the corner, can you feel it?

Lisa ❤

4 interview tips to help you prepare as a NEW manager 👊

So, you just got promoted (yay!) and are now managing people for the first time (another yay!).  It’s a great opportunity for anyone to gain people management experience and when you do, you learn a ton not only about others but about yourself.

When you step into your first leadership role, you’ll inevitably be faced with the task of hiring people as well.  Whether it’s hiring someone for your own team, or simply participating in an interview for a role in your dept./division and you’re elected to be on the interview slate.  What’s important in either situation, especially if it’s your first time is knowing how to conduct an effective interview.

There’s no manual on how to perfect an interview and I would confidently say, it’s all about practice, practice, practice!  But there are some best practices you can learn and adopt to ensure you’re starting off on the right foot.  I for one early in my career remember sitting in on interviews as an observer, listening in and it was a great learning opportunity on not only to understand what questions to ask (pertaining to that specific role) but the importance of preparing ahead of time.

Besides, second to being a great leader and leading your high performing team, hiring people will be one of the most important sets of responsibilities you’ll hold in your role.  Too many times, new managers are entering their leadership position with little to no guidance on how to interview and more importantly, how to assess talent.   Having some guidance and structure on what to keep in mind at the offset can be helpful and set you up for success!

Keep in mind your approach may vary depending on if you’re hiring for your team or someone else’s, however the below tips can serve as a great starting point to help you prepare before diving into your first interview as a first-time manager.

  • This may seem obvious; however, be sure to understand the position / scope of the role you’re hiring for AND ensure everyone that’s part of the hiring team is aligned and on the same page on what to look for.  The last thing you want to do is walk into an interview and not be clear on expectations and what you or your team are collectively looking for.  This will allow you to position and customize your questions appropriately.
  • Ask what you want to know. 
    • I can’t stress this one enough.  It’s been my experience, too many hiring managers will draw conclusions or make assumptions based on what a candidate said in passing or a comment they made vs. having asked a specific question.  *Get curious*, ask open-ended questions, learn the story, then form an assessment. 
  • Talk to your boss or other colleagues who have experience interviewing.  
    • You’re likely not the only one going to be interviewing whether for your direct team or someone else’s.  Find out if there’s a structure in place amongst the interviewers on the interview slate.  In some instances, if there are multiple interviewers, each person may focus on assessing a different skill set or component of a candidates background specific to the open position, i.e. one interviewer interviews for technical aptitude, another interviewer focuses on assessing for team or project management skills, etc. etc.
  • Design your questions to learn of a candidate’s WHOLE self vs. just their professional skill set
    • As a first-time manager new to interviewing, this is a great opportunity to develop a best practice of assessing for a candidate’s WHOLE self vs. just their professional background.  Learn to get to know the individual and assess for all skills. 

Remember, interviewing is a practice and a skill to cultivate.  The best thing you can do is prepare, then practice.  The best opportunities to learn are also when you fail, so if you feel as though your first interview doesn’t go as well as you would have liked, you’ll have plenty of opportunities to try again.  Learn from those experiences and apply those learnings to your next interview.

Here are 2 questions I’d love to get your thoughts on. Leave a comment below and share your experience!

What other tips would you add to the above list?

If you’ve gone through this experience before, how did you prepare as an interviewer when you became a manager for the first time?

Stepping into your first people leadership role can be nerve wrecking to say the least, so be brave and share your experience that might just help someone who’s in this very place today.

With so much love ❤,

Lisa xo