This one ingredient will fuel connection as a leader & in your workplace!

How do you build trust in your organization? How do you measure it?  How do you know when it exists when you’ve just joined a company?

All really important questions and difficult to answer in just one blog post.  But it’s important enough to have ongoing conversations and continue to create awareness on a topic that has only become ever more important in the workplace. 

When I envision organizations where every workplace culture is one where professionals are able to show up as themselves – the unfiltered, unmasked, authentic version behind the suit, the corporate title and the office they sit in, I see opportunities and possibilities.

I also think about trust.  The importance behind an organization that is built on what makes a GREAT company – their people, begins with leaders who not only steer the ship but sets the tone and helps create a culture built on trust.

Leaders who support a culture that not only ‘sees’ their employees as human beings but embodies what this means in the way they lead, behave, speak, show up and ultimately demonstrate integrity and that they are trustworthy. 

My very first experience of what trust looked like in the workplace was my first job out of university. I was working for a software company and my 2nd year at the company, I went through a devastating breakup. My boss at the time happens to call me catching me having “a moment,” and knew I wasn’t doing well.

She not only cared enough to ask me what I needed at that moment but was kind enough to give me the rest of the day to myself. I was already embarrassed that I was heartbroken and couldn’t keep it together at work, and her showing me compassion, meant the world.

One of my favorite storytellers, researchers, Dr. Brené Brown known for her studies on courage, shame, vulnerability and empathy breaks down the anatomy of Trust that speaks to what it looks like in the simplest of terms.  She’s also the author of five #1 New York Times bestsellers: The Gifts of ImperfectionDaring GreatlyRising StrongBraving the Wilderness, and Dare to Lead.

In Brené’s talk on Super Soul Sessions, she discusses how trust is often built in the smallest of moments and over time.  Trust is also something you feel.  You may be able to describe a persons, behavior or actions that lead you to believe and make the decision that you can trust them, but it’s ultimately a feeling you get from someone. 

As a leader, establishing trust is imperative at the onset if you’re just joining an organization and particularly when you have new employees start with your company.  For a new employee, there’s no way to know if you’re trustworthy as a leader, let alone if their new colleagues are also trustworthy, as it’s built with time.  

We all have a role to play in establishing and creating trust amongst our work relationships as in all relationships, it’s a two-way street. To create a workplace culture that fosters a safe environment where employees can show up as human beings, trust needs to be established immediately and begins with leadership. 

Trust is such a huge topic and one that will continue to be discussed, especially as our workplaces continue to evolve, but I’d love to hear your perspective!

How do you establish trust in your organization?

Let me know your thoughts in the comments below and be the example you wish to see. Start with one small act and inspire those around you.

Lot’s of love,

Lisa

How to make tough decisions at work and still lead with heart

As the leader of your organization, ‘tough decisions’ are a part of your role, regardless of how well or how bad your business may be doing.

When things are good, decision making can span from – where to invest next, how to best manage resources, how many people to hire, etc.  When it’s not so great, it could be – where in the business are we falling short, do we need to re-evaluate our workforce and consider layoffs, we’ve lost a major customer – why, etc.

In the midst of ALL of these decisions, your people are always at the center of your business.  Ultimately, if they’re not taken care of, especially in the hardest of times, it eventually trickles down and impacts your customers. 

So, how do you make those ‘tough decisions’ and still lead with heart?

When I switched degrees waaayyyyy back when I was in University, I chose Human Resources for the sole fact that people were at the center of it.  I knew I cared about cultivating strong relationships and wanted to identify a career that centred around prioritizing people.

The rest really didn’t matter as I would learn what area I would thrive in and I enjoyed, yet every area really served a purpose.

I’ve carried a genuine love for this field for that reason alone, but realize it’s evolved over the years as the lines have become blurred between standing true to prioritizing people in the role of HR and running a profitable business.

As a leader, whether you’re making the calls directly or have an HR leader supporting you in making the ‘tough calls’, keep your people front and center.  Particularly, if you’re making a decision that impacts a worker directly or a whole department for that matter.

Your employees have lives, families, etc. outside of their role at your company.  Furthermore, they have feelings of their own.

In your decision making, this means tapping into your sensitivity, your emotions, your humility and remembering that everyone working for you and with you are human beings at the end of the day.

What I believe get’s in the way of being able to do this effectively are a few things:

  • Money and power
  • Mis-used ego
  • Lack of emotional intelligence
  • Lack of awareness

Running a profitable business and having to make tough decisions that impact the future of your business, let alone your people is not easy.  More importantly, being able to shift your perspective and change your behavior to a new way of leading can take time and practice.

If you’re not sure where to start or how to make these changes, consider getting the proper guidance and training from a consultant or other trained resource that can support you. 

Again, whether it’s you as the leader or your HR leader that could benefit from this, using the emotions we often leave out of the workplace can make a world of a difference to your people.  

This is how you start to lead with heart.

What’s one thing you can start doing differently in your company that allows you to use your humility, compassion or sensitivity towards your employees?  Try not to overthink this one, it doesn’t have to be anything major!

We have opportunities EVERYDAY that can make an impact. 😊

Leading with heart,

Lisa

xo

Have you earned your raise or are you just being entitled?

How many times in your career have you gone and asked for a raise feeling in your heart of hearts that you’re truly deserving of an increase? 

What about times when you’ve asked, and you simply felt entitled?  Let me clarify.  You haven’t really outlined the work you’ve done to be deserving of a raise OR actually done anything beyond the basics of your job AND communicated what that looks like, but felt you were owed an increase anyways?

I know ‘entitled’ is a strong word to use and you may think people don’t actually think this way when it comes to salary increases, but unfortunately, it does happen! 

I was having lunch with my friend Julie last week and she was sharing some people management woes that she’s been experiencing.  To give you some insight, within the last year, she’s purchased a small retail business that has 4 locations with a business partner and is now managing multiple employees.

She inherited most of these employees from the previous owners and she’s finally reached the point where she’s ready to re-evaluate the existing staff for a number of reasons.  Ultimately, to identify people who align with the vision of the business and are truly A + team players as they look to grow and develop their business.

Recently, she had one of the staff members ask for a raise over email.  This was someone who had received an increase within the last year (9 months ago to be exact) and was asking for another increase.  Her reasons for justifying her raise went along the lines of the following:

“I respond to all email inquiries”

“Handle all customer orders as they come in”

“Attend to customers when they come in”

Essentially, she highlighted the basics or the ‘bare minimum’ of what her role entailed.  Nowhere did she highlight anything that demonstrated where she had exceeded expectations, showed initiative, etc.  Worst of all, she copied another manager from another location in hopes she would be endorsed by them and support her ask.

If you’re not shaking your head by now, perhaps this is not surprising? 🙂 In any case, there’s much to learn in this example and no surprise that my friend is looking to elevate many of the staff.

As my friend was sharing this example, she was telling me, “I can’t believe the sense of entitlement this employee had.  Asking for a raise over email, her reasons justifying why she’s deserving of one, copying another manager, all of it was so bad!”

She was right.  The way this employee went about asking for a raise, along with the reasons she used for why she felt she deserved a raise were completely underwhelming.  Not to mention, she had recently received a raise and was already asking for another.

If you missed my post on why negotiating all benefits matter when interviewing matters, check it out as I offer some tips to keep in mind when asking for more money!  I offered it as something to consider during the interview process, but it can also be helpful to consider as an employee when getting ready to ask for a raise.

So, when that time of year comes around for you and you’re getting ready to ask for a raise, think about your approach and the way you ask!  We all want to feel valued, appreciated and compensated for the work we do, but the person we’re asking can also feel when the ask is less then deserving and comes across as “just because”.

Think about what you’ve done in the last year to warrant a raise.

  • Did you take initiative to improve a process
  • Did you take on a new project outside of the scope of your role
  • Did you make an impact with your team or help a new employee on board
  • Did you take on additional responsibilities to help a gap in the team

Remember, it doesn’t have to be some extravagant responsibility you took on or initiative for that matter but think outside the box of some intangibles that ‘add’ to the things you’ve done as part of your role.  More importantly, don’t forget to tie that into what impact, value or result was generated as a result of your efforts.

What else might you add to consider when preparing for your salary discussion?

Let me know in the comments below!

Lisa

xo

Investing in a Coach? 4 myths busted YOU should know

The world of coaching is FULL of self-made, self-labeled Coaches in a variety of industries.  From Health Coaches to Business Coaches, to Money Coaches, etc. 

I myself, identify as a Performance Coach and I can tell you, it has nothing to do with athletics or being an athlete! 😉 Rather, it’s the belief that YOU are the peak performer of your life and are resourceful and whole to perform your absolute best.

There’s a variety of Coaches as well that call themselves different things as noted above, that can also cause confusion.  

So, I can imagine how you might be sitting there thinking, “how on earth do I go about choosing a Coach for myself?” and you might even ask, “how do I know if I’ve chosen a ‘good’ Coach?”

Here’s the thing. 

There are loads of professions out there that have endless options from realtors, to fitness trainers, to nutritionists, etc. so I completely understand how the decision making can be taxing, to say the least.

The only way you can know for sure if you’re choosing the right Coach for you is to use your intuition and follow your gut. No amount of reviews, talking to people will make that call for you although they can certainly be very helpful and I would encourage doing the necessary research.

You ultimately will be working with this person, so it’s really important that they’re the right fit for you and you feel good about them.

With that said, here are a few myths I want to bust for you just to clarify what coaching is and what to consider:

Myth # 1

Coaching is just another conversation

Truth:

No. It’s not just another conversation.  Coaching is a thinking partnership and a focused conversation between the client and their coach where they have a safe space to discuss their thoughts and ideas.  It’s a collaborative and supportive partnership led by YOU as the expert in your own life.

Myth # 2

It’s like a different type or another therapy session

Truth:

No. It’s not another therapy session.  Coaching is focused on your present and future.  It’s about what’s happening in your current, present reality and focused on where you want to go.  It’s about growth, expansion, and progress.

Myth # 3

Coaching is telling me what to do and giving me advice

Truth:

No. Coaching is not a substitute or another avenue for giving advice.  As the client, you can certainly ask your Coaches opinion and/or recommendation, however as a Coach, their role is not meant to tell you what to do.  In some cases, they may very well provide a recommendation, however, the goal and focus is not designed to be “telling” or “dictating.”

Myth # 4

Coaching is regulated and all Coaches are certified

Truth:

At this time, Coaching is not regulated which is why anyone can call themselves a Coach.  For this reason, you may find a wide variety of styles of Coaching and some have a formal certification and others do not.  

In many cases, you may have Coaches that DO tell you what to do and offer recommendations, etc.  This is also why it’s highly recommended when doing your due diligence in identifying a Coach, you take the time to get to know someone and ensure they’re the right fit for you and what you’re looking for before making an investment in them as your Coach.

For individuals looking for a certified Coach, the ICF (International Coach Federation) offers credentialing programs for Coach practitioners.  This demonstrates that they’ve gone through a training program and adhere to a level of ethics, standards and understand a set of Coaching competencies that set the standard in the profession. 

So, how do you go about choosing a Coach?

Most Coaches will offer an initial complimentary call to get to know you and determine fit.  This needs to be the right fit for them, just as it is for you. 

  • Take the time to ask them questions.  Any and all. No question is a dumb question and make sure the connection FEELS good for you.
  • Check their website (if they have one) for any reviews and if not, ask if they have references they can offer.
  • Learn what their background is or if they specialize in a particular area, i.e. relationships, corporate/business, career transition, etc.
  • Before investing, understand what their costs are and how long the time commitment is.  This should be crystal clear before you invest in the coaching engagement.
  • Follow your gut and your intuition – it will never steer you wrong!

Even when provided a referral and after reading client reviews, talking to people, etc. I personally like to make my own assessment before I choose to invest in a service and/or business.  Do what works best for you and trust your gut.

The BEST investment you can ever make is the one you make in yourself.

So, make sure it’s the right fit and enjoy the experience!  The right Coach can be transformational and be exactly what you need to help propel you to where you want to go.

What’s been the best investment you’ve made for yourself when it comes to buying a product or service?  How did you know they were the right fit for you?

Let me know in the comments below! ⬇

Here’s to YOU and your growth and your expansion. ❤

Lisa xo

Is fear keeping you stuck? Here are 4 questions to ask yourself

Fear in the spiritual sense is the absence of love.  In everyday life, it looks like this…

“I need to make enough money in case something happens.”

                                      Or

“I have to go to that conference, or I won’t meet any new clients.”

                                      Or

“If I ask for time off, they’ll think I’m lazy and not working hard enough.”

                                      Or

“If I don’t go to that party, they’ll judge me and won’t invite me next time.”

These are just some of the everyday thoughts and stories we tell ourselves that ultimately create a belief that tells us we HAVE to do something which in most cases goes against what we actually want to do.  We create a narrative, worrying about something that hasn’t even happened and thinking about what others will think of you before you even take action.

I’ve had my own share of fear and still do to this day, but I’ve learned to recognize it, understand where it stems from and still choose to act on the smallest of decisions to some of the most important ones in my life.

I’ve spoken about fear before because I believe so strongly that so many of us can benefit from understanding that everything we actually want is on the other side of that fear.  The biggest opportunity you have is understanding where it comes from so when/if it comes up again, you can move past it with greater ease.

A fear-based mentality inevitably finds its way in all areas of our lives and unfortunately can stop us in our tracks from taking inspired action or any action at all to something we want to do!

If you can find that place where when you know you’re being crippled by a fear-based thought, take a step back and ask yourself:

  • How do I feel about this thought?
  • What is this feeling trying to tell me?
  • Where is this thought coming from?
  • What are the thoughts and feelings that will serve me moving forward?

Remember, your fears don’t always come in the major moments or milestones in your life, they can also creep in the smallest most insignificant of experiences!  The key is to be aware of them so you can face them and move past them.

Let me know what you think, what are your thoughts? Leave a comment below.

Where has fear impacted your daily life?

Have you been able to recognize a fear you had and still move forward?

Thanks for stopping by and remember, you’re stronger than your fears, more courageous than you think and braver than you know!

Lisa xo

Team building is great, but an engaged workforce is better!

What do you think of when you think of team building?

The term has been around forever and the very nature of it, to me can be in the form of activities or team exercises that have a social element to it and help to cultivate collaboration and foster a team spirit amongst teams.

While the idea is well intended, as a company, when you’re taking care of your workforce, you don’t often have to resort to a team building activity to ‘bring people together’.  Furthermore, when you invest in them regularly, the time or $$ spent on a team building activity can simply be an outing to spend time with your people.  Why?  Because you care and you want to invest in continuously cultivating your relationship with them.

The benefits of team building I think most will agree are great and ALL companies want to see this:

  • Increased productivity
  • Improved communication
  • Improved and stronger teamwork/collaboration
  • Improved problem-solving skills
  • Increased employee engagement

Many of these benefits can be seen when you’re taking consistent measures every single day in simply investing in your workforce.  Behavior that demonstrates you care for your people and are creating a culture where social outings occur as a way to spend time with your people.  Instead of coordinating a team building activity that you do once every 6 months to help bring your ‘people together’.

In a past life time, I worked for a company where we had a social outing monthly.  We were small enough where we could afford to do that, and it did wonders for getting to know my peers and colleagues on a different level.  Not to mention, the political barriers and professional guards were down, and people were at ease being themselves.

Why does it take a social outing to create that dynamic amongst employees?

This monthly social outing came from the leader at the time who felt it was important to bring everyone together regularly and that’s where it should start.  Yes, we used those gatherings to also celebrate the wins and learn from the misses we had as a company as well.  Set the example as a leader and if you have teams below you, empower your other managers to follow suit amongst their teams as they see fit.

Corporate cultures that embrace their employees as human beings vs. the role they play at work can still generate the benefits listed above.  Team building is a great idea, however, the benefits you can reap from a team building activity can easily be fostered when you create a strong culture of engaged employees.


I’d love to hear from you in the comments below! What are your thoughts?

What are you doing now in your organization that brings your people together?

With so much appreciation,

Lisa xo

How YOU can use a change in your organization to your advantage

How many of you have been part of an organization where you were impacted by some kind of change?  I can see most of us raising our hand.  Whether it’s leadership changes, structural changes, changes in policies, etc.

When you’re part of a small organization, you often feel those changes much more than if you were working for a global organization with a large employee base.  While you may not be able to use every change that takes place to your advantage, there ARE opportunities that can arise from some of those changes if you choose to act on them.

The idea here is, as an employee, learning opportunities come in ALL different ways and finding what that is in your current circumstances is a choice you always have.  How you respond to those changes is up to you.

In my experience, I’ve often seen a lack of manpower (one of many resources that are often needed) be a common challenge come up in organizations.  So, what can that mean for you in your organization?

  • Can you create a new position?
  • Can you learn a new skill and apply it to your role?
  • Can you distribute the work that needs to get done amongst your colleagues/peers?
  • Is the work that ‘needs’ to get done REALLY important or can you dissolve it?
  • Can you automate it?

Think outside the box and consider where and what the opportunity can mean for YOU as the employee.  Changes within an organization doesn’t always mean you need to run for the hills, however, if you do want to stay, consider how you can use the changes to your advantage.

Don’t be afraid to have an open, transparent conversation with your manager and/or leadership team and propose your ideas.

Leaders – don’t be afraid to take note and HEAR your employee’s out when they’re coming to you with ideas and recommendations.  Part of going through any change is including and considering your people in that change.

If you’re going through any changes right now in your organization, what will you propose that can not only help the organization, but help YOU learn something new?

Keep an open mind – learning opportunities come in all shapes and sizes – the best ones are also those that YOU can create! 😉

All my appreciation,

Lisa ❤

Why negotiating ALL benefits when interviewing matters!

Negotiating is a skill we all practice throughout our lives personally or professionally. 

Whether it’s negotiating what restaurant to eat at on the weekend, where to live, what movie to see, etc. as you can see, they range from the smallest of things to major choices we make in our lives.

In our careers, it’s no different and many times, it’s in our professional lives we seem to get tripped up and don’t consider ALL our options as we consider what’s important to us, especially when we’re interviewing.  With enough experience, practice and time, it’s a skill that can be nurtured especially when it comes to negotiating money.

Most candidates when they’re interviewing think of the monetary benefits they’re hoping to earn – a bump on their base salary as they consider their next move.  Salary and bonuses are usually at the top of the list amongst a number of other motivators that are important when interviewing.  Depending on what’s driving your move and desire to change, they may vary in level of importance.

So why do we get choked up when it comes to asking for money?

The truth is, most people are uncomfortable asking for what they want, especially money and more importantly, are not always prepared for the discussion or how to ask.  When I was in the very early stages of my career, I remember sitting across from a manager I had at the time who I admired and happened to be male and I flat out told him, “I hate asking for money…” and his answer to me was, “why?  You work hard, you’re performing, you should ask for what you want.”  That’s it.  Nothing complex, no long lecture, just, ask for what you want.

Of course, there’s more to it and it takes time, experience, practice, etc. to get comfortable with negotiating (and personally, I’m still working at it), but I never forgot that.

Remember, if you don’t ask, the answer will always be NO so if there’s anything you take from this post, ASK for what you want! 

When you’re interviewing and you’re lucky enough to make it to an offer stage, here are some suggestions to keep in mind:

Be open and transparent with your salary expectations – this should really be shared before you get to this stage as most companies will want to understand if they can afford you at the early stages of the interview process.  The last thing you want to do is go through a number of interviews only to reach an offer stage and learn the company just doesn’t have the budget to meet your salary expectations.  Having said that, be clear with what you’re looking for – i.e. 10% increase on my base, $10K sign on bonus to cover X, etc.

Be prepared to negotiate ALL benefits – as mentioned earlier, everyone has various motivating drivers that are important to them and salary is not always the main and only benefit of interest.  What else is important to you?  Work from home?  Vacation time?  Commute allowance?  Think about what these options are.  Also, consider discussing what the flex is around these items early in the process.  Some benefits are company-wide policies that are less flexible to be offered to new hires coming on board.  Again, be prepared to discuss openly the benefits that are important to you.

Ask a trusted colleague or friend if you’re unsure of how to deliver your message and articulate what you want – again, for the purpose of asking for what you want, if negotiating isn’t something that comes easy to you, practice ahead of time with someone you trust and know.  Ask them to role play with you and ask for feedback.  We don’t always see our own blind spots, so asking for someone else’s perspective can be helpful.

Be prepared to get a NO to what you asked for – so this is not always easy to hear and can be deflating especially if you’re trying to seal the deal with a company and new opportunity.  Going back to the above, consider other options you can negotiate, but also, consider this to be a sign that it may not be the right fit if none of your requests or asks were met.  This isn’t about giving up and walking away, however, if you’ve made every effort to explore and consider ALL your options, the one to walk away is also one to consider if you’re requirements aren’t met.

Now, I’d love to hear from you! What would you add to these suggestions? Is there a negotiation strategy you’ve used that’s been effective?

Happy negotiating!

Lisa xo

How to be a bada$$ at work and stay true to your values!

Whether you work in a corporate job or are an entrepreneur, there’s always a balancing act of how much of the real you to show.  You want to be true to who you are, yet societal rules, unspoken politics and corporate hierarchy (in some cases) dictate that only a part of you shows up, while the other parts remain hidden.

But what if something happens at your company where your values are compromised?

Recently this came up for me in my own personal experience and as much as I’d love to say it was easy to deal with and justice prevailed, sadly it didn’t, and it got me thinking. 

How often does this happen in the workplace and how do people deal with it? 

Throughout my career, time and experience have told me this is more common than you might think, and most people don’t know how to deal with it.  I’ve had countless conversations with professionals who have shared a story or an experience they’ve had where something happened that was a direct clash with their values.  In fact, in many cases, they were having a conversation with me because they chose to leave their jobs due to a misalignment with the company and their core values.

So, I got curious and thought about a few things to keep in mind if you’re faced with a situation at work that infringes on your values:

1. What’s the lesson you can learn from that experience?

When something happens where you feel your values were compromised, what’s the lesson you can walk away with?  Are you able to take a step back and consider, what is this experience trying to teach you?  Lessons sometimes come much later after an experience has occurred, but sometimes, it doesn’t take long to realize what an experience is trying to show you if you’re aware!

2. Is there an opportunity to educate your company to help them evolve?

Yes, it’s possible your efforts could fall on deaf ears and your company may not be ready to ‘hear’ or be open to receiving your message to help them evolve.  At the very least, it’s an opportunity to educate where they may be missing the mark.

3. How can you use the experience to help yourself and someone else? 

The disconnect you experienced with your company could be the very gift that you can give to not only your company or someone you know to help them evolve, but yourself.  It’s very easy to internalize and personalize an experience where you feel like you’re the only one in your organization that stands strong to holding your values close to heart.  Instead, consider this a GIFT that you’re honoring your values and recognize that they’re important enough to you to stand for.  See this for what it is and use it to help yourself assess any next steps or course of action.

It’s never easy when you’re put in a situation where your values are being compromised, especially in the workplace.  While it might be difficult to just up and leave your organization if it’s not an immediate option for you, you do always have a choice. 

Use your voice for good and speak your truth even if your voice shakes.

Have you ever faced an experience in your workplace or with a client where your values were compromised? 

I’d love to hear your thoughts.  I know it’s a bit of sticky topic but one I hope you see how helpful it could be to share with others how you might have dealt with this in your own experience.  If you have anything else to add to this topic, I’d love to hear it just the same!

Lot’s of love

Lisa 

Spring is around the corner! What’s your new beginning?

Have you ever thought about how the ending of something in your life or business could very well be the beginning of something new?  Most of us tend to focus on what we’re losing, giving up, sacrificing, ‘ending’, vs. what it could mean for the start or beginning of something new.  Even if we don’t know what that is yet!

For me, this time of year always marks the start of new beginnings and the obvious ending of the Winter season.  Many of us in North America LOVE this time of year as it marks the start of longer days, warmer temperatures, sunshine and patio season is in sight. 

How can we apply this same meaning of changes of the seasons to our own lives?  Embracing a new start and welcoming the new, while saying goodbye to the old and why is it so hard for us to be open to what’s to come?

The idea of something ending can often be interpreted as the ‘loss’ of something.  We take it to mean something much deeper and attach a sentimental, or a symbolic meaning to the experience.  Whether we’re expecting a specific outcome or result, associating a particular achievement to an experience, associating status or even feeling like we have to prove something to someone else.

Here are a couple of examples of what this could look like in our lives.

You’re anticipating a promotion and lose the opportunity to someone else.

  • You say, “I’m not good enough”

You interview for a position and you don’t get it.

  • You say, “I’m not smart enough”

You apply for a business loan and you don’t get it.

  • You say, “They don’t think I have what it takes”

You launch your first program/workshop/masterclass in your business and no one signs up.

  • You say, “What I have to offer isn’t valuable enough”

Nearly every one of these examples, can be chalked up to your self-worth. Not feeling good enough or not feeling worthy enough as you are, regardless of how you finish any of these sentences.  We almost instinctively internalize it to mean something about our own self-worth. 

So, what if instead you re-framed your answers and said this:

You’re anticipating a promotion and lose the opportunity to someone else.

  • You say, “There’s something bigger in store for me”

You interview for a position that you don’t get.

  • You say, “There’s a better position out there for me”

You apply for a business loan and you don’t get it.

  • You say, “Now may not be the right time, I’ll try again”

You launch your first program/workshop/masterclass in your business and no one signs up.

  • You say, “I’ll review my offering, and launch it again”

There is ALWAYS a better way to view the ‘loss’ or ‘ending’ or perceived ‘missed opportunity’, to a greater blessing up ahead or something ultimately better for you.  You may not know what that might look like, or what it might be and you may not always get what you want when you want it, but you do get what you need in the perfect time. 

Your job is simply to be open to what could be without being attached to what was lost or what’s ending.  The first shot at something also doesn’t have to be the last, so yes, try, try and try again.

What can you look at in your own life right now that you feel you didn’t get? That promotion, that new job, that big win or sale and instead, what could be the ‘new beginning’ that is waiting for you?

Let me know in the comment box below!

Spring is around the corner, can you feel it?

Lisa ❤